Social deduction party games to make you question your friends’ loyalty

Social deduction party games to make you question your friends’ loyalty

Social deduction games are ones with a hidden betrayer or bad guy. Everyone *seems* nice enough, but may have secret motives that place them at odds with the rest of the group. While your job might be to carry out some in-game mission, their job is to screw things up - better find them before they make too much of a mess!

Social deduction tends to be a good option for parties, where quick games thrive. That’s why we’re leaning toward lighter fare in this article, even though social deduction games exist across a wide range of strategy levels.

 

 

Quick and light social deduction games

 

Spyfall social deduction game

Spyfall / Spyfall: Time Travel

Spyfall is a game of blending into the crowd. At the start of each round, everyone receives a card. All cards will have the same image of the same location - unless you’re the spy. The spy has no idea where the group is located in the game, and must figure out as much as they can without giving away their secret identity. Once the players have peeked at their cards, the interrogation round begins. Players must ask one another questions about their location, the answers to which will hopefully convince the group that they belong without giving too much information to the spy. If the spy can pass the round undetected or can identify their location, they win. Otherwise it’s a win for the rest of the group.

Spyfall: Time Travel is played essentially the same way, but with a "when" instead of a "where." It’s a standalone game, so the first Spyfall isn’t needed to play the second.

Spyfall and Spyfall: Time Travel are great for 3-8 players (a minimum of 4 is best), ages 12 and up.

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social deduction game

A Fake Artist Goes to New York

Fake Artist is like a mashup of Spyfall and Pictionary. In this game, the fake artist is trying to play it cool while the group practices their illustration skills. The real artists all receive a card with the same secret word, then take turns drawing that word one line at a time. The fake artist, on the other hand, only gets an X on their card and must do their best to figure out what the heck they’re drawing before they’re found out.

A Fake Artist Goes to New York is a game for 5-10 people ages 8 and up, and good art skills are NOT required.

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One Night Ultimate Werewolf social deduction game

One Night Ultimate Werewolf

One Night Ultimate Werewolf is a snappy social deduction game in which baddies terrorize unsuspecting villagers.

Each player receives a secret identity card, identifying them as a Seer, Troublemaker, Tanner, werewolf, Drunk, or other role. You clearly want to find the werewolves, but it isn’t that easy. You see, your townsfolk have a serious sleepwalking problem; each one peeks at cards, switches cards, or self-sabotages depending on their roles. You are also working on deadline, with only minutes to unravel what the heck happened last night.

A free phone app serves as narrator / referee, guiding you through each round. It’s an excellent addition and will keep things moving along.

A single game takes 10 minutes, so expect to rapid-fire your way through round after round after round…

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Social deduction games with moderate depth and in-game goals

 

Bang! social deduction game

Bang!

Ever wanted to be in a spaghetti western? Bang! is your chance - it’s an Italian game set in the Wild West, complete with all your favourite Old West tropes. Players take on the roles of the sheriff and his deputies versus the outlaws and renegades, but only the sheriff’s identity is public knowledge. Players have to figure out who’s on which team while throwing bullets, guns, horses, barrels, wagons, Cat Balou, and other western movie mainstays at each other.

But to be perfectly honest, half of the fun of this game is making jokes about banging your friends.

Play it with 4-7 people, ages 10 and up.

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Avalon social deduction game

Avalon

Time to get Medieval on this good vs. evil business. In Avalon, players are secretly aligned with the forces of Merlin (the good guys) or the forces of Mordred (the baddies). Merlin and friends are simply trying to complete a few quests for the glory of Avalon, but Team Mordred is playing to sabotage. That is so like them.

Can the forces of Merlin identify the saboteurs through trial and error in time to complete their quests and bring glory to Avalon?

Avalon plays 5-10 people, ages 13 and up.

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Deception Murder in Hong Kong social deduction game

Deception: Murder in Hong Kong

Deception is like a mashup of Concept and Mysterium. One player takes the role of Lead Investigator, who wordlessly communicates which of the remaining players is secretly a murderer through the use of symbols on a board. Everyone else must try to interpret these symbols to identify a murderer in their midst. But as one of the crowd, the murderer is fully able to speak and mislead the group, provided they can avoid suspicion long enough to keep themselves safe.

Deception: Murder in Hong Kong is a game for 4-12 players, ages 12 and up.

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Saboteur social deduction game

Saboteur

With a name like Saboteur, you can probably guess what the hidden baddie is up to in this one. And you’d be right.

Saboteur is set in dwarven mines, where all the good little miners dig for gold. The saboteurs, however, want the gold for themselves and do what they can to derail the group’s plans for a stable, gold-based economy.

Saboteur is best for 3-10 players, ages 8 and up.

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